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Ok, so...I hate my job. Also I may be drunk. BUT, that doesn't mean I don't still hate my job. Its hard to believe that its been 10 years since I last did an update to Polymer City...I don't know where the time went. For a time, I thought that this might be the year that I rebooted the franchise and went all-in, but for me to do what I did before would require giving up my day job, and I just don't think its realistic to make the $2000/mo I'd need through online sources even though the funding dynamic for online comics has changed quite a bit from a decade ago. Does anyone have any ideas, advice, or at the very least a voice of reason as to whether or not a gamble of this magnitude is worth a shot? I need an external perspective on this because while I'd like to give it a go, I don't want to end up living in my undersized (yet still attractive) car. 

Its really a nice car, but no internet.
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:iconmoxydoxy:
MoxyDoxy Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
I go part-time on my art (5-10 days a month, $400-$900) and if I went full-time I believe I could get it to $3000/m easy via Patreon. And it's consistent enough to be comfortable and relatively stress-free as far as jobs go.

What you need is about 3-6 months runway to get to the $2000/m you're looking for. You could kickstart or scrimp and save or some combination to give you the $5000-$6000 you want.

Consistent, quality drawing is only part of the work. The rest requires you to be able to keep up with growing and maintaining your patron base.

I strongly encourage you to consider it as a viable option for you. I could go through the numbers and scenarios and strategy with you. It won't be easy, but it's very doable, and a hell of a lot better than a a job that sucks your soul and you hate.
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:iconeccentricgentleman:
EccentricGentleman Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2017
I don't think you feel so bad about your job. I've never held a job despite trying for years.
When I saw your post about being tried becuase you had to work 2 jobs I envied you. Becuase not only one but 2 people thought you were worth hiring.
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:iconfluoridesting:
I think you should start with a Patreon account right now and get the ball rolling, let people donate and get some neat things!
Like high-resolution copies of new and old art, copies with both color and clean line-work for people who wanna color your stuff.

It would be up to you what values you want to set, or what rewards you want to give.
I personally think asking for $4 or $5 a month for viewing everything you put on Patreon is more than fair.
$1 could let people see stuff and show support, just not be able to see the high-resolution copies.
$10 or $15 could then get into specific things, like being entered into a monthly commission raffle or something.
Then set realistic goals for yourself depending on how much you start to get per month, at minimum the extra funds might help while you try to transition to a new job.

I don't think you should guarantee the comic will come back, only you can decide if you want to or not.
If you plan ahead and put yourself out there, this type of decision doesn't HAVE to be a gamble.
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:iconchaoswolf1982:
chaoswolf1982 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 24, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Nobody's defining your schedule but you.

I know a guy whose comic was on a rigid MWF (B&W) and Sunday (Color) for literally years, but he evenutally suffered from burnout and a shift in job, so he took a half-year off and recently returned, with just the Sunday color as his schedule, and it's much easier on him, and exceptionally few of his old fans have spoken negatively about it.

Maybe you could do the same - stick to one day a week until you get back in the flow of things.
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:iconzeartist:
Zeartist Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Hobbyist Writer
Chris, I'm right there with you, man. Morgalla is over twenty years old now since I originally came up with the idea and no publisher, comic company, animation company, etc. are interested in her and she's awesome.

I know it's tough, to build a fanbase and get people to just LIKE your work. Positive comments on your drawings is one thing and they're awesome but people not buying the books and being FANS of Morgalla is another.

I don't have all the answers, sadly. But I've always enjoyed your work, both writing and drawings. I guess the number one reason why I keep going is the fact that I've put SO MUCH freaking effort into this AND if I quit, years from now I just know that I'm going to regret it. "What if I continued on?" 
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:iconurusaiwrangler:
UrusaiWrangler Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional General Artist
I asked myself that same question when I stopped PCC in 2007. Honestly? Not much has changed. :p
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:iconeccentricgentleman:
EccentricGentleman Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017
If you are really strapped for time and cash, perhaps you could take your comic to comic company. they would have artists, writers and printer to help you. Or maybe you could take it to an animation comany.

Just remember, if you do that, you will lose a lot of control over the proect.
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:iconzeartist:
Zeartist Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Hobbyist Writer
That's something that I've done and I've been at it for roughly 16 years give or take. Nobody is interested in my work and it's annoying for Morgalla is awesome.

So sure, someone might say yes...but it's a lot like publishing a book: get ready to hear the word "NO" a lot, if they reply at all.
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:iconurusaiwrangler:
UrusaiWrangler Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional General Artist
Yeah, I'm gonna take it slow. I'm not desperate or anything, but my mood swings have me going off into the weird part of the woods time and again. :p
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:iconeccentricgentleman:
EccentricGentleman Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017
How about writing it as a book? That might be less effort then drawing.
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:iconeccentricgentleman:
EccentricGentleman Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017
Have you considered publishing it so people will have to pay for it?
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:iconmiltonteruel:
MiltonTeruel Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Set a very generous schedule so that you can start producing pages without it feeling like a burden.  One page a week, or a month... whatever gets you started.  Then you can look into sites like Patreon and other crowd-funding ideas to see what the options are for making enough money to eventually do it full time.
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:iconblackkusanagi:
BlackKusanagi Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2017  Student General Artist
Seconded.
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:iconnoname4848:
NoName4848 Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Maybe take a little vacation? Try things out with PCC, if it fails, go back to your old job. Or look for a new one that pays as good but is more enjoyable.
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:iconurusaiwrangler:
UrusaiWrangler Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Professional General Artist
Well, I'm not quitting work altogether, but I am tossing applications out there like mad. I gotta get out of where I'm at.
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:iconnoname4848:
NoName4848 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, I can only say: good luck!
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:iconfellania-bloodclaw:
Fellania-BloodClaw Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Hobbyist Writer
I think the best thing for you to do is keep PCC a hobby, something to do as a strip once or twice a month and rattle the ol'tip jar for a while till you build or rather re-build the notoriety of the brand. Try some commissions too... and well start maybe thinking about what kind of job your skill set can get you? We definitely don't want you living out of your car. 
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:iconriv3th3d:
riv3th3d Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017
I think one option would be to set up a simple kickstarter - let's say to get a collected edition of PCC in PDF and/or print form. This allows you to figure out how many are still interested in the comic and characters, and those willing to pay for the project. From there, you can ascertain the amount of interest and how to pursue a patreon (which, right now is the easiest format to approach something like this, but they'll take their cut naturally). Whether you plan to have world-building, other art, in addition to a comic.

Then, find part-time employment with (hopefully) set hours (having worked retail for several years, that's easier said than done) so that you have somewhat guaranteed income a month. Commissions might have to be an option until you have enough of a fanbase that will support you just for the comic. Possibly offer more physical media (pdf or print of sketchbooks, selling original paper versions of art, etc.).

The obvious endgoal would be to have people pay you to draw whatever you want, and be able to sustain an income from it. However, if the plethora of artists out there, having the part-time job might be necessary till you have something solid to lean on.

I can't say I'm unbiased about this approach, because I'm interested in not only more comms from you but also more tangible media.  I'm probably a minority in that regard (as a fair amount of my budget is for patreon and commissions) so take what you will from that.
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:iconericf989:
ericf989 Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017
Two words: Patreon (Maybe just one)... ;)
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:iconthefwank:
TheFwank Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Professional Writer
Well, first off, sorry your job's dragging you down so badly. :/

Two thousand a month is a far stretch for patreon, at lest anytime soon.  PCC's just been a little too dead for a little too long to command that kind of money right off the bat.  Don't get me wrong, I'm a super-huge fan, but with 1300 followers you'd need every one of them to donate more than a dollar to a patreon to reach your goal, and that's really just on the extreme near-end of the bell curve probability-wise.

I would suggest starting PCC up again here on DA, for free, long enough for the "Holy crap, Polymer City is back!" news to percolate through fans new and old alike, and then start the patreon after a month or so, when you've got enough free content to draw customers in.  Even a slower schedule, you should be able to bring in some bonus money, and maybe kind of ease from one job to the other without having to take a flying trapeze leap. ^^;
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:iconurusaiwrangler:
UrusaiWrangler Featured By Owner Edited Feb 20, 2017  Professional General Artist
It's more pipe-dream than reality, I think. I was just daydreaming more than anything...pretty sure that ship's long sunk. Honestly, I could probably be a bit more consistent with income through commissions rather than comics.
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:iconthefwank:
TheFwank Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Professional Writer
Oh, don't gt me wrong, I think you could live off PCC, especially nowadays.  Just not in the span of a month, is all. ^^;
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:iconurusaiwrangler:
UrusaiWrangler Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Professional General Artist
Well, I'm not thinking about some sort of eureka moment. Its more just an external perspective from people who might see things a bit more clearly than I do.
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:iconthefwank:
TheFwank Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Professional Writer
Ah, okay.
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:iconsatsumalord:
SatsumaLord Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, if you're considering doing any kind of online funding, Patreon may be your best bet.  In fact, from what I've noticed, Patreon pages that are centered around a specific project (like a webcomic or web series) tend to do the best, so using Patreon as a means to reboot Polymer City may not actually be too bad of an idea.  :)

With that said though, if you'd want to reboot the comic and make it as more of a job than just a hobby, you'd have to make a pretty comprehensive guide on what exactly you want to accomplish with the comic, as well as what kind of rewards you'd be willing to offer to those willing to fund your projects.

A good example of what I'd consider to be a successful Patreon page would be :icondrakefenwick:'s own Patreon, which you can check out here ---> ( www.patreon.com/brianchristybu… ).  So consider looking over their page and getting ideas on what you can offer for your own webcomic, as well as what kinds of rewards and goals you'd like to set up for yourself.

Anyway, I hope what I had to say helps and I wish you all the best on your next potential venture.  :)
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:icondrakefenwick:
drakefenwick Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2017
It has done well for me. It's helped me cut back my hours on my retail job, as well as it helps keep me focused and motivated on the project. After all, if people are throwing money at me, I have to keep on it. 
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:iconwobbleblot-alt:
Wobbleblot-Alt Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I would suggest Patreon but even high end artists I hear have a hard time making good income at times, and certain months are a bit dryer then past months, cant really trust when people will be subbed all of the time and it can be rather stressful to handle if its your only source of income, so other then that, I wouldn't know a good online alternative to a paying job, times are tough nowadays, I hope at least other people can suggest better solutions.
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